Tips and Motivation on How to Get Back into Work After a Break

Vacation

I went on vacation.

Vacation from work. Vacation from writing. From business. From routine life. I intentionally didn’t think about anything work related.

It was a blast!

Doesn’t this look like a great place to lose yourself?

Hilton Head

Yes, we went to Hilton Head Island. My first time to visit this grand place.

While in a rented condo, I found a book by Jimmy Buffett called A Salty Piece of Land. The cover invited me to sit on the beach with my feet in the water. I had to go there, so I started reading. I didn’t get far with all the bike-riding, zip-lining, and paddle-boarding type activities we had planned. Before I knew it we were back in the car headed home without my ever getting to chapter 3.

Grinding out the Return

The direction of Frankie’s headlights (that is our appropriately named old ’97 Avalon: “Frankie Avalon”) made me regret getting back to work, routine, and regular life.

I just wanted to read, to prolong the fun stuff, and keep away from the drive to perform. I just wanted to be. To be me. Do what I wanted, when I wanted. Have no worries. No troubles. No … nothing required.

After I got home, I kept trying to live that way, but found myself drifting, listless and purposeless. After all, A Salty Piece of Land was left behind and what could I do?

I was almost depressed.

A Salty Piece of Land

Am I the only one who has trouble getting back into the swing of things after a vacation?

Search for Motivation and Starting Again

During my listless days, I read one woman’s idea. The day before her vacation, she made a to do list for the day she would return. That way she didn’t have to remember where she was in her work or what needed to be done next.

(Tweetable) The day before your break, make a to-do list for the day you get back.

For me, starting always seems the hardest part–or is that finishing? Either way, I didn’t have her foresight and consequently I flopped.

Eventually, I reinstated my regular habit of reading God’s word and prayer journaling. Yes, regretfully, I even went on vacation from some spiritual disciplines. (Please don’t throw stones or rotten fruit. I’m just a girl doing her best–most of the time.)

And as soon as I got back to spiritual endeavors, I found part of my cure: the fix for my losing of heart, the listlessness of not wanting to work, the purposeless of life. Once again I found the freedom in being me that I wanted was in giving my everything to God. (Not just giving lip comments or commitments, or adhering to the precepts of men or traditions of religion, but wholly submitting self to God, a life totally given to God’s plan.) I am his and I do his work.

(Tweetable) Freedom in being yourself is in giving your all to God.

I gained purpose for my work and life again.

That’s all the help I’ve got for getting back into the swing of things.
1. Make a post-vacation to do list before you leave.
2. Gain respect for spiritual disciplines. They give direction.
3. …What have you got?

Surely I’m not alone in post-vacation blahs. I’m certain there are other ways of getting motivated that you’ve used successfully. Maybe some absolute failures too. Please share in comments.

Question: So how do you do it? What actions, plans, attitudes, or motivations help you get back to work?

 

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What do you think?

3 thoughts on “Tips and Motivation on How to Get Back into Work After a Break

  1. vondaskelton says:

    Yes, it’s hard to get back in the swing of things in order to get things done, but my problem is I haven’t stopped long enough to get anything done since getting back from vacation. But I don’t like the option: Withdrawing from life and family responsibilities won’t work, either. :-( Maybe we’ll have this all figured out by the time we’re 80. Maybe. But I’m not holding my breath.

    • I agree that we can’t ignore life or family responsibilities, but my problem was Iooked for excuses to not do the work. I am digging myself out of a pitiful state. Just starting is hard.

  2. vondaskelton says:

    Yea, I think we’re both pretty pitiful.